WHAT THE F?

*** Aluminum (TMA), Barium, Strontium, Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6), and Lithium have been dumped in space to study and modify space weather for over sixty years (60) and nobody knew. - Big Wobble Blog *** Then there's Z. July 18, 2022 - I was awakened this morning with a clear message that there are three years left until the simulation ends. - ELLIE *** Ego & Time are our biggest anchors to ignorance- Walter Russell

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Saturday, September 28, 2019

Super Volcano Valles Caldera and Jemez Pueblos lawsuit

Valles caldera is located in north-central New Mexico in the central Jemez Mountains west of Santa Fe. It is the oldest of three young caldera-type volcanoes in the United States; the other two are Yellowstone in Wyoming and Long Valley in California.
The Valles caldera-forming eruption occurred approximately 1.25 million years ago when huge volumes of Bandelier tuff were explosively evacuated from a underground magma storage region. As a result of the "supereruption," the ground subsided along a network of nearly circular faults, called a ring fracture, leaving the caldera, a 20 x 23 km (12 x 14 mi) depression. Resurgent doming of the central caldera floor occurred between 1.25 and 1.22 million years ago, which was immediately followed by additional dome eruptions around the caldera margins up until about 40,000 years ago. 

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Here is the opinion:
An excerpt:
THIS MATTER comes before the Court on the bench trial held on October 29-November 20, 2018; November 29-November 30, 2018; December 3, 2018; December 5, 2018; and December 13, 2018. The primary issue is whether Plaintiff Pueblo of Jemez has the exclusive right to use, occupy, and possess the lands of the Valles Caldera National Preserve (“Valles Caldera”) pursuant to its allegedly unextinguished and continuing aboriginal title to those lands. The Court concludes that Jemez Pueblo has not established aboriginal title to the Valles Caldera. Although the evidence proves that Jemez Pueblo has actually and continuously used and occupied the Valles Caldera for a long time, the evidence also shows that many Pueblos and Tribes also used the Valles Caldera in ways that defeat Jemez Pueblo’s aboriginal title claim.
Earlier posts here.

Valles Caldera (or Jemez Caldera), is a 12-mile-wide collapsed volcanic caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Within its caldera, Valle Grande is the largest valle (grass valley) and the only one with a paved road. 
Valles Caldera is one of the smaller volcanoes in the supervolcano class. 
The circular topographic rim of the caldera measures 19 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter. The caldera and surrounding volcanic structures are the most thoroughly studied caldera complex in the United States.
Research studies have concerned the fundamental processes of magmatism, hydrothermal systems, and ore deposition.
Nearly 40 deep cores have been examined, resulting in extensive subsurface data. The Valles Caldera is the younger of two calderas known at this location, having collapsed over and buried the Toledo Caldera, which in turn may have collapsed over yet older calderas. The associated Cerros del Rio volcanic field, which forms the eastern Pajarito Plateau and the Caja del Rio, is older than the Toledo Caldera. These two large calderas formed during eruptions 1.47 million and 1.15 million years ago.[6]
The Caldera and surrounding area continue to be shaped by ongoing volcanic activity.more

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Thursday, September 12, 2019

"CHASING ICE" captures largest glacier calving ever filmed #WaterEvent

Barrie Trower and Mark Steele on #5G (2019) | BETTER AUDIO



EMF Pollution from Humans

"Electromagnetic pollution (EMF) may be the most significant form of pollution human activity has produced in this century, all the more dangerous because it is invisible and insensible." - Andrew Weil, M.D., Author of 8 Weeks to Optimum Health & Spontaneous Healing

Saturday, September 7, 2019

Friday, September 6, 2019

America’s First Opioid Epidemic

Percy Bysshe Shelley, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning were all familiar with, if not addicted to, laudanum.
Doctors had been alerted to the dangers of addiction starting in the 1870s.
READ

Pig Island and Pirates (free gift)

Learn about the famous swimming pigs of The Bahamas: where they come from, how they spend their time, and how you can spend the day with them on Pig Beach! HERE

(free) Pirates of Nassau Downloadable E-Book

Think you know all about the pirates of the Caribbean? Think again! Nassau Paradise Island has a rich and varied history and was home to some of piracy’s most famous and infamous characters. Pirates like Blackbeard and Calico Jack walked the very streets of downtown Nassau back in the 1700s when the Caribbean was ripe with pirates rich with loot from Spanish and French merchant vessels and Nassau was a Pirate’s Republic.
Whether you’re a history buff, parent to a pirate fanatic, or are simply interested in learning more about what Nassau used to be like, our Pirates of Nassau E-book is filled with pirate facts and tales to delight and inspire. So what arr you waiting for? Download your copy and dive into the swashbuckling stories of the real Pirates of Nassau. HERE

Now avast ye and get reading, ye landlubber! There are pirate adventures to be had!

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

The insect apocalypse DW Documentary

Is It Or Isn't It Recyclable?

How to See Palestine Whole

Louis Haghe after a drawing by David Roberts, “Gaza”(1839) lithograph, From The Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia, Egypt, & Nubia vol. 2, (1843) pl. 15; Royal Subscription edition (image courtesy Library of Congress Digital Collections)
To observe that images distort reality is nothing new. (John Berger and his collaborators reminded us of this in Ways of Seeing nearly 50 years ago.) What is more interesting and important is to see how and why this is done in European and, eventually, American images of Palestine.

READ

Sunday, September 1, 2019

Illegal Gold Miners? Amazon Rainforest?



“A large part of the gold that’s commercialized in the world comes stained by blood and human rights abuses,” said Julián Bernardo González, vice president of sustainability for Continental Gold, a Canadian mining company with operations in Colombia that holds legal titles and pays taxes, unlike many smaller mining operations.

A map compiled by environmental group Amazon Geo-Referenced Socio-Environmental Information Network shows 2,312 illegal mining sites in 245 areas across six countries, which the group called an “epidemic.”

In Latin America, criminals see mining and trading precious metals as a lucrative growth business, carefully hidden from U.S. consumers who flaunt gold around their necks and fingers but have no idea where it comes from — or who gets hurt. The narcos know their market is strong: America’s addiction to the metal burns as insatiably as its craving for cocaine. NTR, for instance, was the subsidiary of a major U.S. gold refinery that supplied Apple and 67 other Fortune 500 companies, as well as Tiffany & Co., according to a Miami Herald analysis of corporate disclosures.

READ: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article194187699.html#storylink=cpy

Global Warming Is Conquering the Vikings



Global Warming Is Conquering the Vikings

Ancient Arctic artifacts are disappearing as warming unfurls.
By
In Norse mythology, there are many myths that once known, are now lost. But the Norse, of course, left behind more than their tales. They also left behind their things and, in places like Anavik, on the western coast of Greenland, their dead.
And long before Vikings came to Greenland, the indigenous Inuit people left behind mummies, as well as hair with intact DNA.
Elsewhere in the Arctic, on an icy island called Spitsbergen, there’s a place called the Corpse Headlands, where there are graves filled with the bodies of 17th and 18th century whalers. When archeologists excavated the site in the 1970s, they found down-filled pillows, mittens, and pants sewn together from pieces of other pants. The Arctic’s ice helps preserve these snippets of human history. But snippets of organic material rot when it’s hot, and new research is finding that as the world warms, remains like those at Anavik and Corpse Headlands will decompose before archaeologists are ever able to unearth them.
“The microbial degradation of the organic carbon is really temperature dependent,” said Jørgen Hollesen, a geographer at the National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen.
To get a clearer picture of the warming, Hollesen and his team installed weather stations at five sites in western Greenland, where they measured soil temperature and water content. Inland sites, they found, get less rain overall than coastal sites, and they also tend to be hotter. Such dryness and hotness, Hollesen said, create ripe conditions for decomposition because bacteria that decompose organic matter have more air to breathe.

Rapid Decomposition

The team then modeled, under different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios, just how much decomposition they might expect to see in the next century.
They found that instead of Arctic archaeological remains taking at least a century or more to fully decompose, up to 70% will likely vanish in the next 80 years. In Greenland alone, there are over 6,000 registered archaeological sites. This number includes both Norse and Inuit sites.
Photo of a mummified infant in a thick fur parka
Human remains, like this mummified infant unearthed at Qilakitsoq, are threatened by changes brought by a warming climate to the soil of Greenland. Credit: National Museum of Denmark
“We cannot afford the luxury of thinking that heritage sites preserved underground are preserved,” said Vibeke Vandrup Martens, an archaeologist with the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research who was not involved in the new Scientific Reports study.
Vandrup Martens studies remains on Svalbard that stand a good chance of decomposing at a rapid pace over the coming years, and she hopes this new research will help archaeologists like her when it comes to prioritizing which of those sites they need to work to preserve. “It’s a question of choosing, or just accepting having lost it,” she said.
It’s still not possible to say what kinds of remains, be they bones or clothes or wood, will decompose first. But finding that out is what Hollesen wants to do next by keeping an eye on what kinds of remains appear to be decomposing the fastest.
“We don’t know which ones contain something that could be fantastic,” he said. “You don’t know what you haven’t found yet.”
—Lucas Joel, Freelance Journalist
Citation: Joel, L. (2019), Global warming is conquering the Vikings, Eos, 100, https://doi.org/10.1029/2019EO131559. Published on 27 August 2019.

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